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Hugo (2011) for Rent on DVD

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Hugo (2011) for Rent on DVD, Common Sense Note
Parents need to know that although this book-based period adventure about the art and magic of movies is rated PG, it may be a tad too mature for younger elementary school-aged kids. Between the orphaned main character (whose father dies in a fire), the looming threat of being sent to the orphanage by the mean station manager, and an extended sequence about the history of early film, it’s unlikely that kids under 8 will follow the sophisticated story. Since author Brian Selznick’s novel is aimed at middle-grade readers, that’s a good age to target for the movie, too. Kids who do watch will take away worthwhile messages about perseverance and overcoming fears, and budding filmmakers will especially delight in the movie’s second half. Expect a little bit of flirting and hand-holding, a few insults, and one drunk (adult) character.
Sexual Content
Two different sets of adults flirt with each other and are shown walking hand and hand. Married Papa Georges recalls his love of Mama Jeanne, and the two embrace and kiss. Hugo and Isabel hold hands, and she kisses him on the cheek in one scene. The station inspector has humorous conversations with the policeman about marriage, infidelity, and a baby’s parentage of a baby. The station inspector asks the policeman if he has “had relations” with his wife in the past year.
Violence
Hugo’s father is killed in a fire. The station inspector sics his Doberman on unaccompanied kids and then brusquely throws them into the station jail before transferring them to an orphanage. In a nightmare, Hugo dreams that he’s about to be run over by a train and then that he transforms into the automaton.
Language
Insults like “idiot,” “no-good thief,” “liar,” and “drunk.”
Social Behavior
Emphasizes the importance of films and how magical movies can be for their audience. Hugo’s relentless faith in his father, in his mission to fix the broken, ends up being a metaphor for healing Melies’ broken heart. Hugo and Isabelle discuss how everyone — every thing — has a purpose, and you just have to find out what it is for that purpose to be met.
Consumerism
Not applicable
Drugs / Tobacco / Alcohol
Uncle Claude drinks out of a flask and is obviously drunk. The inspector calls him a host of synonyms for “inebriated.” People are shown with wine glasses at the train station cafe.

Legend
Age appropriate
Not an issue
Depends on your kid and your family
Not appropriate for kids of the age most likely to want to see it

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When his father dies, 12-year-old orphan Hugo takes up residence behind the walls of a Parisian train station. There, he meets Isabelle, the daughter of filmmaker Georges Méliès, who holds the key to Hugo’s destiny.,

Source: https://dvd.netflix.com/Movie/Hugo/70202136

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